Notes From The Field:
In Indonesia, testing a playground, school, homes for toxic lead

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A few days ago, we visited a school, playground and homes in one neighborhood in Jakarta to test for toxic lead.

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Children can get poisoned when they ingest lead flakes or lead dust that comes off of brightly painted playground equipment, worn desks, or windowsills (among others).

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We collected soil samples and used an XRF to test for lead in a playground.

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At a school, we used dust wipes to take samples of the floor and window sills.

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We also tested homes in one neighborhood and spent time speaking to residents about cleaning habits and the ages and genders within each household.

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Our goal is to eventually test 100 homes around Jakarta as part of a GEF — UNDP funded study to determine the extent of exposures to lead from paint and battery recycling in communities in Indonesia and the Philippines.

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This project kicked off with a lead paint workshop on Monday that we organized with representatives of the Indonesian government and two local nonprofits — KPBB and Bali Fokus — to talk about lead in paint and potentials for residential exposures.

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