Want lead-free food? Visit the first “Barro Aprobado” restaurant in Mexico

The media turned out in force to help us  launch "Barro Aprobado" and spread awareness about lead-free pottery.

The media turned out in force to help us launch “Barro Aprobado” and spread awareness about lead-free pottery in Mexico.

Across Mexico every day, millions of meals served in homes and restaurants come with an extra, unseen ingredient — toxic lead.

Want lead-free food?

The Casa de Campo restaurant, housed in a 260 year-old building in Cuernavaca’s historic downtown in Morelos state, is the first restaurant to go lead-free under the “Barro Aprobado” program launched by Pure Earth/Blacksmith Institute and partners.

This means that the restaurant is only using traditional Mexican pottery that has been certified lead-free to cook and serve food.

The "Barro Aprobado" campaign launched on the beautiful grounds of the Casa de Campo, the first restaurant certified lead-free under the program.

The “Barro Aprobado” campaign launched in Morelos state, on the beautiful, historic grounds of the Casa de Campo, the first restaurant certified lead-free under the program.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“We are very excited that the food prepared in this building will be lead-free, quite probably for the first time in over two centuries,” says Daniel Estrada, who oversees the “Barro Aprobado” lead-free pottery project for Pure Earth/Blacksmith in Mexico.

Most traditional pottery used in homes and restaurants across the country are produced by local artisans using toxic lead glazes. Of the estimated 10,000 to 50,000 pottery workshops across the country, only about 100 are lead free.

A display of "Barro Aprobado" lead-free pottery on the grounds of the Casa de Campo restaurant.

A display of “Barro Aprobado” lead-free pottery at the Casa de Campo restaurant. Now, the food prepared in this building will be lead-free, quite possibly for the first time in over two centuries.

Because of the widespread use of leaded pottery, over 70% of the population of Mexico—an estimated 80 million Mexican men, women, and children—have blood lead levels above the WHO standard of 5 ug/dl.

  • The average blood lead level in Mexico City, where traditional pottery is used less often, is 8 ug/dl.
  • Elsewhere across Mexico, the average blood lead level is about 10 ug/dl.
  • Among lead-glaze based pottery artisans, the average blood lead level is 26 ug/dl and can reach as high as 65.
Delicious food served on lead-free pottery.

Delicious food served on lead-free pottery.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The “Barro Aprobado” program is working with local potters to get them to switch to a cheaper, lead-free glaze. At the same time, the program is introducing these lead-free potters to restaurant owners to show that there is a demand for lead-free pottery.

“We are hoping that these relationships will lead to more restaurants replacing their leaded pottery with lead-free ones that are produced by local traditional potters they know and trust,” says Daniel.

Certified!

Certified!

The “Barro Aprobado” program is also giving out free lead test kits to about 100 stores so that customers can be guaranteed that what they buy is truly lead-free.

 

 

 

 

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